On The Town: Frye, Vermillion, SIFF & PNB, Spring 2015

Posted on July 02, 2015, 8:00 am
7 mins

Artist Lucien Pellegrin blending in at the Leo Saul Berk exhibition opening #FryeArtMuseum #Seattle #Art #Artist

A photo posted by vanguardseattle (@vanguardseattle) on

Leo Saul Berk Opening at the Frye Art Museum

Earlier this month, a solo show of artist Leo Saul Berk‘s work titled Structure and Ornament opened at The Frye Art Museum. The show is a personal reflection on the transformative elements of architecture, inspired by Berk’s upbringing in the famous Ford House designed by architect Bruce Goff. The opening was colorful, not only thanks to the different pieces, but the many walks of life that it attracted. The Director of Communications at the Frye, Jeffrey Hirsch, was caught only in glimpses as he surveyed the vibrant crowd in his suave, all-white suit. People were buzzing over the subliminal effect Berk’s pieces had on them, resulting in a constant hum of awe and excitement. The VIP section was lively, with glasses clinking and laughter booming as artists from different genres and mediums came together in a common appreciation. Artists Allyce Wood and Pete Fleming were in attendance (their last Frye opening before the couple relocates to Norway this summer). Even though he was pensive and rapt in the work on the margins of the crowd, artist Lucien Pellegrin (also a founding member of the Love City Love collective) stood out with his cool, urban look.

Bingx Album Listening Party at Vermillion

Seattle’s Capitol Hill has long been a breeding ground for new music, and Vermillion remains one of the venues most devoted to presenting diverse local music in its back bar, past the arcade games and gallery space in the front. Just walking in, you get a tangible, youthful, urban feel on any given night, and this was especially true when local artist Bingx held a small get-together to unveil all the tracks of his newly produced hip-hop album. A young talent, his entire family was there to support him including his father and his cousin. (They may not have realized, but they were visibly singing along to every track they could.) With the open bar keeping the wine flowing, listeners mingled and fed off of the excitement of a young artist, just breaking out into the music scene in Seattle. Bingx’s manager, Michael Doyle, was always in near sight of the artist as well as the producer of the album, Chris Pack who founded Swayside Music in Seattle. The climate of pride was clear as the artist’s story of struggle and hardships made each track all the more personal.

Bingx crew palling around in the back bar at Vermillion.

Bingx crew palling around in the back bar at Vermillion.

The album and the artist behind it at Vermillion

The album and the artist behind it at Vermillion

 

Jason Schwartzman Party and Meet and Greet at SIFF 2015

 

The Seattle International Film Festival hosted scores of candid, independent films, and among them was 7 Chinese Brothers, starring the critically-acclaimed, indie actor Jason Schwartzman. Schwartzman arrived at the SIFF red carpet in a simple, fitted suit and a rocking a Pacific Northwest hairdo and beard. His intentionally unkempt hair was not the look to which Wes Anderson viewers are accustomed. “I grew it out just for this film screening because I knew it was going to be in Seattle,” joked the actor, as he greeted press with his entourage behind him. Director Bob Byington stood in similar uniform next to Schwartzman as he peered through his large, black-framed glasses.

I asked Schwartzman what his thoughts were on the film industry as a whole, proclaiming that he was simply “too small” to answer such a big question. But he did address the fact that Seattle is the perfect environment for the emergence of a film such as this, which explores every day struggles in a minimalistic fashion. He seemed keen on the casual and young aspects that Seattle does sometimes tend to lean toward.

Pacific Northwest Ballet Presents Next Step 2015

And of course, there are the institutions of art and culture in Seattle that remain stable and consistent in their aims. The Pacific Northwest Ballet put on their “Next Step” show this past week, showcasing the works of several choreographers via the talents of young Seattle dancers. The show was truly all ages, from students to young artists to established patrons, all there for the six world premiers and the opportunity to see a new generation of dancers in action. Read our review of the performance.

Pacific Northwest Ballet School Professional Division students in Chelsea Adomaitis’ film muet, presented as part of PNB’s 2015 NEXT STEP choreographers’ showcase.  Photo © Elise Bakketun.

Pacific Northwest Ballet School Professional Division students in Chelsea Adomaitis’ film muet, presented as part of PNB’s 2015 NEXT STEP choreographers’ showcase. Photo © Elise Bakketun.

More photos from these events:

 

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Stylish, sweet creatives Ryan Patterson and Christina Hicks in front of two mixed media sculptures by Leo Saul Berk at the Frye.

Sandy Ha of Build Architecture and Carrie Kahler of poetry Northwest in front of Leo Saul Berk's "Rope Bridge" at the Frye.

Sandy Ha of Build Architecture and Carrie Kahler of poetry Northwest in front of Leo Saul Berk’s “Rope Bridge” at the Frye.

Scott Lawrimore (c) of Jacob Lawrence Gallery and Jeffrey Hirsch (r) of the Frye Museum joke around with the guests in the VIP section during the Frye's latest opening bash.

Scott Lawrimore (c) of Jacob Lawrence Gallery and Jeffrey Hirsch (r) of the Frye Museum joke around with the guests in the VIP section during the Frye’s latest opening bash.

Bingx, family and friends at the album release party in June.

Bingx, family and friends at the album party in June.