Spring Comes to Francine Seders

Posted on March 25, 2013, 8:04 am
4 mins

Francine Seders Gallery is welcoming spring with colorful work with an organic feel by a number of Seders’ most lauded artists. The main room hosts a selection of works by Robert R. Dozono, while in the upstairs galleries one can see works by Juan Alonso, Marita Dingus, Alfonse Borysewicz and Denzil Hurley.

A detail of a work by Robert R. Dozono.

A detail of a work by Robert R. Dozono.

Robert Dozono incorporates artifacts of everyday life and experience into his artworks. His unconventionally shaped and composed canvases layer the refuse of life amongst expressive bolts of paint. Tea bags, toothbrushes, bottles, lids, and other pieces of Dozono’s life build upon the canvas. It is hard to not reach out and touch the artworks, to engage with familiar elements of life infused with rare color. As Dozono puts it in his artist statement: “I attempt to foreground what we are doing to our natural resource by using a canvas layered with what is normally cast aside.” Nothing was wasted in Dozono’s childhood home, and as his discomfort with wasteful aspects of our culture and its disrespect for nature inform much of his art. In his watercolor Clackamas River Series, there is no accumulation of “trash,” working strictly in two dimensions but with a depth of feeling. Regardless of the medium, our relationship to the environment is his subject matter.

A different sort of layering and view of the environment is seen in some of the works in the group show. Juan Alonso’s Spring Thaw pieces have luminous, physical depth through the layered method of their creation. The dripping milky aesthetic upon bands of colors is quite different than his previous works, but shows such continuity. In Spring Thaw #4 the medium takes on an almost wax-like appearance, amplifying the organic dripping sensation while the stripes below provide a structure or grounding for the work.

Marita Dingus with one of her works at Francine Seders.

Marita Dingus with one of her works at Francine Seders.

Juan Alonso with a work at Francine Seders.

Juan Alonso with a work at Francine Seders.

Marita Dingus’ work is quite playful, yet spiritual in a sense. Found, uncommon materials are assembled into invented idols of the modern world. They speak to her unique personality but have a certain elemental quality based on the materials composing them. Metal and Fabric Flower Fence is almost reminiscent of the quilting tradition, but Dingus’ use of metal components transforms it. The central figure in the piece speaks to a recurring address of African American heritage and culture in Dingus’ work. The presence of both Juan Alonso and Marita Dingus at the opening reception made for an even more exciting artistic experience for gallery goers at the opening on March 10. Juan Alonso’s engaging conversations with visitors on art and invention were sure to inspire.

The exhibits at Francine Seders will be available through March 31.

Claire Reiner is a writer, artist and recent graduate from the University of Washington’s School of Art with a major in Art History. She is interested in recent art movements and subcultures (1950s, 60s, 70s) and how they have shaped present perceptions and practices of art. She grew up in Southern California and moved to Seattle in 2010. She is quite influenced by the unique geography of both places and enjoys hiking and exploring the Pacific Northwest. Reiner covers visual art exhibits in Seattle and seeks to contribute to a profound and positive artistic community, as well as encourage people to come out and experience art moments for themselves. Reiner is also the Executive Assistant for VanguardSeattle and handles any press related needs.